Monday

Room 6

09:00 - 17:00 (UTC+10)

2 Days

Intentional TypeScript

Oh, TypeScript! You bring so much joy, and so much pain!

As one of the essential skills in today's software development, TypeScript can be quite a handful to grasp, especially as it keeps growing to meet ever growing demands.

If you,

  • want to start with TypeScript but feel intimidated, or
  • you have already but feel a bit lost with daily struggles against the type checker, or
  • you feel TypeScript can be used just like Java or C# without much fuss, although
  • you find online code examples and answers cryptic and hard to comprehend

Then come along to this leisurely and fun workshop! There will be strange and familiar examples, some fun quizzes, plenty of
interaction, but not too much pressure.

We go in with strong intentions. The focus is laying a clear and sound foundation for our understanding, not going over every single feature or quirk of the language.

Specifically, we will,

  • Learn to talk and listen to TypeScript

How to quickly validate our types? How to read the cryptic error messages? How to shorten the feedback cycle for efficient development

  • Get a good taste of the power of TypeScript, and how we may hurt ourselves this way

We go over a few (just enough, not too many!) key language features, especially those that make TypeScript so different and so powerful, then drive them home with plenty of hands-on.

  • Embrace the TypeScript mindset

Let's be open-minded, let TypeScript lead us naturally to new ways of problem solving. With more exercises we observe such effects, push the envelope for ourselves and reinforce the new realisations.


With this workshop under the belt, you should feel calm and comfortable with TypeScript, and have the structure and techniques required to explore on your own the excitement it brings.

Pre-requisites

No TypeScript experience should be required to attend; but prior programming experience (in any language) is essential.


Hackle Wayne

A veteran in the trade, Hackle enjoys programming as a thinking game. He advocates programming functionally and tries to share his learnings in ways that are pragmatic, idiomatic and accessible.